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Board Office
359 Woodland Road

Madison, NJ 07940

Phone: 973-593-3101

Humanities: Lang Arts and History
 
Social Studies Department Electives
 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 5 credits – 1 year - Grades 11, 12
Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- in AP US History or A in Enriched US History 2, Enriched US History 1 and completion of summer project. Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.

This elective course provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. policies and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the voices, groups, institutions, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. politics

AP MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY 5 credits – 1 year - Grades 11, 12
Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- in AP History or A in Enriched U.S. History 2, Enriched U.S. History 1, and completion of summer project. Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.
This course offers a survey of European history from 1400 to 1980. Students use a college-level text, read both primary and secondary sources, do considerable writing, and make oral presentations. In addition to familiarity with major events, students develop their critical thinking skills, finding in each European history unit the significance of an individual, group or event. They must read critically, weigh evidence, and draw valid conclusions. They prepare for the AP Exam in May, which all members of the class are required to take. Those with qualifying scores may earn college credit.
 
AP PSYCHOLOGY 5 credits - 1 year - Grades 11, 12
 
Pre-requisite: Teacher recommendation, final grade of B- in AP or Honors United States History or A in Enriched U.S. History 1 or 2 and completion of summer assignment. Note: Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam.
This course offers an introduction to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included are consideration of pyschological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each major subfield of psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Students prepare for and are required to take the examination in May and may earn college credit depending on their score on that exam.

HUMAN BEHAVIOR 2.5 credits - 1 semester - Grades 11,12
Pre-requisite: None

This is an introduction to basic sociological and psychological concepts and draws on the various fields of each social science discipline--learning, personality, behavior, heredity, mental illness, social psychology, race, gender, deviance and social control. Students examine behavior of both humans and animals in an attempt to improve their understanding of human behavior.
 
INTRO TO ECONOMICS 2.5 credits - 1 semester - Grades 11,12
Pre-requisite: None

Students learn how our market economy deals with the basic conflict between unlimited wants and limited resources. Attention is given to such topics as inflation and deflation, business cycles, supply and demand, our monetary system, and ways in which other types of economies deal with economic problems. Students learn basic economic laws and examine different types of economic behavior.

HISTORY Of HOLLYWOOD 2.5 credits -1 semester - Grades 11,12 - Offered Even Years
Pre-requisite: None

How accurate is the history filmed by the Hollywood moviemakers? This course examines "historical" commercial films as they are presented to modern moviegoers. Students will learn to question what they see on the screen. Sorting through the hype for the accurate historical content and assessing the value of a film will be done through critical movie viewing, and research and analysis of primary and secondary sources.

CURRENT AFFAIRS/DEBATE 2.5 credits - 1 semester - Grades 9-12
Pre-requisite: None 

Students will learn about a broad range of contemporary issues which impact American lives today. Social issues, the economy, foreign policy, and government decisions and actions will make up the categories of current affairs to be studied. Students will form research teams to examine these issues. The semester will culminate in a formal debate of one issue which the students select as most significant.

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